Housing Inventory & Profile

Background


Puyallup is predominantly a residential community, as approximately 59 percent of the City’s land area is devoted to residential uses. The characteristics of the existing housing stock within the Urban Growth Area can be described in terms of age, condition, unit type, tenure, vacancy, and value or rent. All data provided is based on the 2010 City limits, unless otherwise specified.

Age


According to the 2010 U.S. Census, approximately 30% of the housing stock within the city limits was constructed more than 50 years ago. In many instances these are smaller homes which provide lower cost housing alternatives and give the older portion of the community its distinctive character.

Nearly 17% of the homes within the city limits were constructed within the past decade. Contrary to the past, many of the developments in the unincorporated area now include neighborhood features such as sidewalks, street trees, small “tot lots” and street lighting. Additionally, all new subdivisions are also served with sanitary sewer service.

YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT

ESTIMATED NUMBER OF

UNITS BUILT

PERCENT OF TOTAL HOUSING UNITS

Built 2000 to 2012

2,691

16.9%

Built 1990 to 1999

3,348

21.0%

Built 1980 to 1989

2,285

14.3%

Built 1970 to 1979

2,871

18.0%

Built 1960 to 1969

1,236

7.8%

Built 1950 to 1959

1,106

6.9%

Built 1940 to 1949

658

4.1%

Built 1939 or Earlier

1,749

11.0%

Total Housing Units

15,944

100%
Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau - 2008 -2012 American Community Survey 5 Year Estimates

Unit Type and Tenure


Single-family housing (including duplexes) is the predominant housing type within the City of Puyallup and surrounding unincorporated area, comprising 64.3% of all housing units within the city. Multiple-family housing (3 or more units) accounts for nearly 35% of the housing units within the city limits, while manufactured homes represent less than 1% of the city’s housing stock. However, current land values and zoning allowances tend to discourage the development of manufactured home parks and the placement of manufactured homes on individual building lots.

Housing tenure, or the percentage of owner- versus renter-occupied housing, can be an indicator of the type of housing community residents prefer and/or can afford. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, approximately 53% of the housing units within the City are owner-occupied. This figure represents a 2% decrease in the percentage of owner-occupied units since the previous census (2000).

Vacancy Rates


Vacancy rate of housing is a general indication of the availability of housing and the viability of the housing market. A vacancy rate of 4% to 7% is indicative of a sound housing market which is neither restricted due to extremely limited unit availability nor slack due to an excess of available units. Vacancy rates within the city limits were approximately 7.6% in 2010, indicating a weakening of the housing market in comparison to 2000. This is comparable to what is occurring elsewhere in the county and state following the recession of the late 2000s.

Value of Housing


Single Family Housing


The median reported assessed value of housing within the city limits increased by approximately 74% in the past decade from $155,100 in 2000 to $270,400 in 2010. This overall increase is the result of substantial increases in the housing market in the early to mid-2000’s peaking in 2007, and then was tempered by a significant recession from 2008 through 2012. In 2014, the housing market has begun to recover and prices are again on the rise, with the average home in Pierce County now selling for approximately $235,000.

Multiple Family Housing


The median rent for renter occupied units within the city increased from $702 in 2000 to $1,089 for average apartment rental costs and nearly $1,600 for average single detached home rental costs. 2012 vacancy rates for apartments are approximately 5%.